Le paradoxe d'Hans Moravec - IA et Robotique

Moravec’s paradox is the observation by artificial intelligence and robotics researchers that, contrary to traditional assumptions, reasoning requires very little computation, but sensorimotor skills require enormous computational resources. The principle was articulated by Hans Moravec, Rodney Brooks, Marvin Minsky and others in the 1980s. As Moravec writes, « it is comparatively easy to make computers exhibit adult level performance on intelligence tests or playing checkers, and difficult or impossible to give them the skills of a one-year-old when it comes to perception and mobility ».

Moravec’s paradox is the observation by artificial intelligence and robotics researchers that, contrary to traditional assumptions, reasoning requires very little computation, but sensorimotor skills require enormous computational resources. The principle was articulated by Hans Moravec, Rodney Brooks, Marvin Minsky and others in the 1980s. As Moravec writes, « it is comparatively easy to make computers exhibit adult level performance on intelligence tests or playing checkers, and difficult or impossible to give them the skills of a one-year-old when it comes to perception and mobility ».

Moravec's paradox - Wikipedia

@Bertrand C’est quoi la relation avec les systèmes 1 et 2 ?

Cela veut dire que même le système 2 n’a pas besoin de beaucoup de ressources de computation comparé à la perception / mobilité ?

Très intéressant en tout cas, je ne savais pas.

Dans une IA. Dans un cerveau non. Parce que faire de la « raison » avec un cerveau c’est comme planter un clou avec une petite cuillère

Ça m’a fait repenser aux dangers du cyborg (l’IA qui remplace ce qu’on fait manuellement et donc qui va nous atrophier) :

"When you dig through history, you see the exact same complaints about the younger generations. It’s only the context that changes.

Take this op-ed from 1920 claiming that a scandalous new genre known as « jazz » was ruining young people’s ability to get married. All that hippity-hoppity dancing and women showing their knees and, uh… black people, was apparently going to be the downfall of society or something.

Or take the fact that in the 18th century, when novels became popular for the first time, parents complained that their children were reading too much. They used to call it « reading rage » and they worried that if their kids spent too much time reading books, they’d lose track of reality.

Hell, even if you go back to Ancient Greece, you can find instances of philosophers complaining that the invention of writing had made people dumb—that kids these days just didn’t have to memorize ten thousand lines of poetry the way their grandparents did, and that was clearly going to ruin their minds.

So, the next time you see grand declarations of the death of an entire generation, just think about jazz ruining marriage… and then laugh about it. Because for thousands of years, every generation has been fucked yet somehow turned out fine."

C’est de Mark Manson.